New App Lets VR/AR Headset Users Authenticate by Looking at Their Hands

“The company’s PalmID palm pattern recognition system has been trained on tens of thousands of images, and requires only a standard camera for imaging.”

Users of Epson’s Moverio BT-300 smartglasses can now authenticate just by looking at their hands.New App Lets VR/AR Headset Users Authenticate by Looking at Their Hands

The cutting-edge system comes by way of Redrock Biometrics, one of the rising stars accepted into the Wells Fargo Accelerator program last autumn. The company’s PalmID palm pattern recognition system has been trained on tens of thousands of images, and requires only a standard camera for imaging. It therefore offers a surprising yet natural application in VR and AR headsets, whose forward-facing cameras can be used to let users confirm their identity with the wave of a hand.

In a statement announcing the integration, the companies explained that the biometric authentication can be used for things like “secure sign in, in-app purchases and access to security-sensitive assets.” As Epson America technical product manager Leon Laroue put it, “The ability to use biometric authentication opens the door to increased interactivity without disrupting the AR experience.”

Moverio BT-300 users will be able to download the PalmID app starting May 11th, and Redrock Biometrics is inviting other developers to contact the company about taking advantage of its biometric SDK for their own products. That could lead to more headset applications to come, especially as such products continue to become more popular in the marketplace.